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Amaryllis

£15.00 £13.00

h:10-15 cm

It is a small genus of flowering bulbs, with two species. The better known of the two, Amaryllis belladonna, is a native of the Western Cape region of South Africa, particularly the rocky southwest area between the Olifants River Valley to Knysna.

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Amaryllis Planting and Care
Amaryllis Quick Tips:
Planting Period: October until the end of April.
Flowering Period:  Late December until the end of June.
Flowering time is 7-10 weeks.
Larger bulbs produce more flowers.
Always store un-planted bulbs in a cool place between 40-50 deg. F.
Amaryllis-One of a Kind
Of all flowering bulbs, amaryllis are the easiest to bring to bloom.  This can be accomplished indoors or out, and over an extended period of time.  The amaryllis originated in South America’s tropical regions and has the botanical name Hippeastrum.  The large flowers and ease with which they can be brought to bloom make amaryllis popular and in demand worldwide.  The amaryllis comes in many beautiful varieties including various shades of red, white, pink, salmon and orange.  There are also many striped and multicolored varieties, usually combining shades of pink or red with white.
Preparation for Planting
The base and roots of the bulb should be placed in lukewarm water for a few hours.  Remember, if you cannot plant the bulbs immediately after receiving them, store them at a cool temperature between 40-50 degrees F.
Planting
Plant bulbs in a nutritious potting compost, many are available pre-mixed.  Plant the bulb up to its neck in the potting compost, being careful not to damage the roots.  Press the soil down firmly to set the bulb securely in place after planting.
Placement and Watering
Plant the bulb, or place the potted bulb in a warm place with direct light since heat is necessary for the development of the stems.  The ideal temperature is 68 to 70 degrees F.  Water sparingly until the stem appears, then, as the bud and leaves appear, gradually water more.  At this point, the stem will grow rapidly and flowers will develop after it has reached full growth.
Flowering Period
Bulbs will flower in 7-10 weeks as a general rule.  In winter the flowering time will be longer than in spring.  Set up your planting schedule between October and April with this in mind.  To achieve continuous bloom, plant at intervals of 2 weeks for stunning color in your home or garden.
After-Bloom Care
After-Flowering. After the amaryllis has stopped flowering, it can be made to flower again.  Cut the old flowers from the stem after flowering, and when the stem starts to sag, cut it back to the top of the bulb. 
Leaf Growth and Development. Continue to water and fertilize as normal all summer, or for at least 5-6 months, allowing the leaves to fully develop and grow. When the leaves begin to yellow, which normally occurs in the early fall, cut the leaves back to about 2 inches from the top of the bulb and remove the bulb from the soil. 
Bulb Storage. Clean the bulb and place it in a cool (40-50 deg. F), dark place such as the crisper of your refrigerator for a minimum of 6 weeks. Caution: Do not store amaryllis bulbs in a refrigerator that contains apples, this will sterilize the bulbs. Store the bulbs for a minimum of 6 weeks. 
Plant Again. After 6 weeks you may remove bulbs whenever you would like to plant them. Plant bulbs 8 weeks before you would like them to bloom.

Scientific Name: Amaryllis sp.
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Toxicity: Toxic to Dogs, Toxic to Cats
Toxic Principles: Lycorine and others
Clinical Signs: vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hypersalivation, anorexia, tremors.
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally mild to moderate
Common signs to watch for:
Drooling
Vomiting
Hypotension (drop in blood pressure)
Respiratory depression
Abdominal discomfort

The Amaryllis is a part of the large Liliacea family but does not have the same toxic principles as the more common “true” lilies (e.g., Easter, Asiatic, Day, Japanese show, etc.). The plant contains similar toxins to the flowers in the Narcissus group or the Belladonna Amaryllis (the only true Amaryllis). The leaves, stems and bulbs contain phenanthridine alkaloids which can cause vomiting, hypotension (drop in blood pressure) and respiratory depression. Excess salivation and abdominal discomfort can be seen from the raphide oxalate crystals, which are more concentrated in the bulbs.
Poison type: Plants
Alternate names: Liliacea, Narcissus, Belladonna Amaryllis

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